Pharmacists like to travel, too.

Sure, we frequently tout the benefits of travel assignments for nurses. We even occasionally talk up traveling for OTs, PTs and speech therapists.

Not so much for pharmacists.

That stops today! Today is all about the great career opportunities traveling offers pharmacists and pharmacy techs, and provides some tips on how to find a traveling opportunity.

  1. First of all, travel assignments for pharmacists and even pharm techs are numerous. If you want to travel, you shouldn’t have a problem finding assignments.
  2. A “problem” could arise when you see a travel position that’s appealing but is located in a state in which you’re not licensed. You must be licensed in the state in which you’re going to practice. If this happens to you, don’t worry (too much) and work with your travel staffing recruiter to start the ball rolling to take the steps to get licensed in the state(s) in which you’d like to practice.
  3. Your staffing manager/recruiter can help you with the logistics of licensure, but it’s ultimately up to you to actually go through the process and get the license.
  4. Speaking of travel staffing firms and how to find them, you could:
  • Speak to travelers on assignment at your current employer to see which companies they’re registered with.
  • Google “pharmacy travel jobs” and see what companies come up. Pick a few, look over their websites and contact a handful that appeal to you.
  1. Understand that it’s perfectly OK to register with more than one travel staffing service. In fact, it’s even expected! All the staffing services ask is that you don’t “play” one firm against an other and cancel an assignment you’ve already accepted with one firm simply because another firm came up with one (for the same time frame) that you consider “better.” Word gets around and if you renege on your commitments with one firm, others soon will know. Besides, it’s just completely unprofessional to flake on your obligations.
  2. Chances are you’ll “interview” with your travel staffing manager via phone or video chat and not in person because the travel staffing firm might be across the country from you. If you do have a video interview, aim to look as if you’re dressed professionally (as you would for an in-person interview) from the shoulders up.
  3. During your interview, don’t be afraid to ask questions. You can get a lot of information about what it’s like to be a traveler, but hearing it from a “live” person can also get those “quirky” questions out of the way (“What happens if I accept an assignment and then I come down with a nasty case of the flu and I can’t make it?”)
  4. The travel staffing firm is looking for a few things:
  • Do you have the experience that will allow you to “hit the ground running” and be of use to a client company immediately while on assignment? This usually means you should have at least one or two years of professional pharmacy experience behind you.
  • The interviewer also will want to assess how flexible you are. How well you’re able to handle “constant” change. How well you’re able to get along with people from all sorts of socio-economic backgrounds, etc.  You’ll need to make sure you can show examples of your experience with this kind of flexibility when you interview.

If you’re thinking of exploring a career as a pharmacy traveler and if you have any questions at all, don’t hesitate to contact a recruiter at MedPro Healthcare Staffing. We look forward to chatting with you!