“Tell me a bit about yourself.”

This question almost always is one you can expect to hear in a job interview.

But the interviewer is not hoping to learn about your life story, your hobbies, your family situation. Instead, the interviewer wants an answer that details a bit about your past professional experience and how it matches his or her needs.

A good answer would be something along the line of “I’ve worked as a speech therapist for 10 years, working mostly with Parkinson’s patients. I decided to become a speech therapist because I’ve always been fascinated about how the mind works when it comes to speech and I’ve not been disappointed once in the decade of my career. But now I want to change things up a bit and help other types of patients with their speech. And, frankly, having a chance to learn new things in different facilities in different cities across the country is very appealing to me at this stage of my career.”

Read below for other typical interview questions you could hear (and good answers for them):

  • What is it about travel healthcare that attracts you? While it’s certainly OK to say you want to travel and see more of the country, you also should be sure to first highlight that you’re eager to learn new skills and work with different types of patients. You also are eager to help hospitals and other medical facilities when they have critical staff shortages.
  • What makes you think you’re cut out for this work? The interviewer is doing a bit of fishing here. He or she wants to know if you understand the need for flexibility (a ton of flexibility) in a traveler and also that this healthcare career has its own particular stresses (constant movement, potential for loneliness, always being the ‘new guy,” etc.) So you should research the pros and cons of travel healthcare and have reasonable and thoughtful answers regarding why you want to work as a traveler.
  • What was a typical day like in your previous job? The interviewer here is trying to ascertain if your day-to-day work is pretty low key or go-go-go. You don’t need to have a job that’s constantly stressful, but if you’re in a position that doesn’t challenge you much with change or the need to be flexible, you’ll want to be sure you can handle change easily and provide some examples – and they should be very specific examples – of how you handle change/stress.
  • How do you manage stressful situations? The interviewer doesn’t want to know that you never feel stress (that’s humanly impossible), but how you handle/manage it. You need to provide one or two specific examples of stressful situations you recently encountered, how you handled them and what the results were.
  • Why should I hire you over someone else? This allows you to bring up how you’re different from any other candidate. Do you have the exact skills and background the recruiter needs? Have you worked as a traveler before and received rave reviews? Are you known for your grace under pressure? Before any interview, sit down and decide what it is that differentiates you as a traveling healthcare candidate.

If you’ve ever thought of exploring the opportunities offered you as a healthcare traveler, don’t hesitate to contact the recruiters at MedPro Healthcare Staffing. We’d love to speak with you about our terrific healthcare career opportunities.